PSM/RMP Services

We can provide you with the following additional PSM/RMP services...

  • Mechanical Integrity
  • Mechanical Integrity



    A thorough inspection of the refrigeration system should be conducted by a competent refrigeration engineer every five (5) years. Mechanical Integrity Audits consist of detailed inspection reports that will highlight all of the issues found, items requiring more work and items that require immediate repair.
  • Three Year Compliance Audit
  • Three Year Compliance Audit



    A Compliance Audit must be performed at least every three years. The audit should examine each element of the program and determine whether the associated procedures and practices are being followed. For example, the audit should evaluate whether operating procedures are being followed, appropriate operator training is being conducted, and Process Safety Information is being updated as necessary.
    The audit team must include or consist of at least one person who is knowledgeable in the process such as an operations, maintenance, or engineering employee/supervisor/manager.
    A written report of the audit findings must be developed. Responses to the audit findings must be promptly addressed and documented, and any deficiencies found during the audit must be promptly corrected. Once the audit is completed, the appropriate actions to address the recommendations must be taken and documented. The actions must be documented regardless of whether the response is positive or negative. If, for example, the audit team recommends that all operating procedures be rewritten in a different format, but the employer determines that the current procedures are clear and understood by operators in their current format, the reason for rejecting the team's recommendation must be documented.
  • Five Year RMP Report
  • Five Year RMP Report



    Under the authority of section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act, the Chemical Accident Prevention Provisions require facilities that produce, handle, process, distribute, or store anhydrous ammonia to develop a Risk Management Program, prepare a Risk Management Plan (RMP), and submit the RMP to EPA. Covered facilities were initially required to comply with the rule in 1999, and the rule has been amended on several occasions since then, most recently in 2004.
  • Non-Destructive Testing
  • Non-Destructive Testing



    Nondestructive testing (NDT) is the use of noninvasive techniques to determine the pipe wall thickness. One popular NDT technique is ultrasonic testing, which uses sound waves to penetrate the pipe wall.
  • Process Hazard Analysis
  • Process Hazard Analysis



    The Process Safety Management Standard requires employers to perform a process hazard analysis (PHA) for each covered ammonia refrigeration process. The purpose of performing a PHA is to identify and analyze the significance of potential hazards associated with the process and to provide information to assist employers in making decisions for improving safety and reducing the chances of a catastrophic ammonia release.
  • Material and Energy Balance
  • Material and Energy Balance



    The material and energy balance should document the overall change in energy in the compressors, cooling evaporators, and condensers. Ideally it will provide indication that the compressor capacities exceed the projected system loads, and that the condenser capacities exceed the compressor capacities.
  • Ammonia Charge Calculation
  • Ammonia Charge Calculation



    (Maximum Intended Inventory) Calculated refrigerant inventory within the refrigeration system.
  • Relief Line Calculation
  • Relief Line Calculation



    The PSM Standard does not identify the information that should be included in the design and design basis documentation; however, in its VPP Supplement, OSHA recommended that the following items be included as part of the design and design basis documentation:
    • Identification and description of each relief device.
    • A listing of all equipment which will be relieved through the device.
    • Design pressure.
    • Set pressure.
    • Listing of all sources of overpressure considered.
    • Identification of the worst case overpressure scenario or relief design.
    • State of material being relieved (i.e., liquid, vapor, liquid-vapor, liquid-vapor-solid, along with an identification of the material which was the basis for the relief device selection).
    • Physical properties of the relieved materials, vapor rate, molecular weight, maximum relieving pressure, heat of vaporization, specific gravity and viscosity.
    • Design calculations.
  • Valve Index
  • Valve Index



    List of all valves within the refrigeration system
    Common Valve Index Lists include for each valve the location, equipment, line, tag number and the normal state (Ex. open, closed, auto).
  • Correction and cleanup of P&ID
  • Correction and cleanup of P&ID



    Facilities must have piping and instrument diagrams (P&IDs) for the equipment in the refrigeration system. P&IDs are detailed drawings which may contain the following items:
    • A lead sheet containing a legend of the symbols and abbreviations used on the P&IDs.
    • Refrigeration equipment (vessels, compressors, pumps, condensers, etc.) and a descriptive name or identification number. P&IDs should be set up to indicate relative elevations of equipment and to depict gravity and pumped flows where possible. Pre-fabricated equipment packages will typically not be shown in detail unless it is necessary for a clear portrayal of the refrigeration piping, instrumentation or utility connections.
    • Equipment description blocks which often list the manufacturer, model number, capacity, design limits, and materials of construction
    • Valves, strainers, and relief valves shown schematically using the symbols on the lead sheet.
    • Instruments (pressure gauges and transmitters, level gauges and transmitters, temperature gauges and transmitters, etc.) identified and numbered in accordance with the lead sheet and ISA standards. Control strategy, including associated alarms and interlocks, should be clearly indicated with instrument functions and mounting locations shown.
    • Refrigeration piping contained in the system. Sections of piping typically contain a unique identification number which indicates the line size, service (contents of the line), line number (a unique number for referring to that line), pipe class (material of construction), insulation (if applicable), and heat tracing (if applicable).
    • Utility tie-ins to refrigeration equipment including normal instrument air supply connections to instruments
    • Refrigeration line continuations from drawing to drawing which extend to the edge of the drawing.
    • Title blocks for each drawing indicating the company name, facility location, type of drawing, simplified drawing name, drawing number, person who prepared the drawing, revision number, revision date, and provisions for drawing approval.
  • Field Verification of P&ID
  • Field Verification of P&ID



    Facilities must have piping and instrument diagrams (P&IDs) for the equipment in the refrigeration system. P&IDs are detailed drawings which may contain the following items:
    • A lead sheet containing a legend of the symbols and abbreviations used on the P&IDs.
    • Refrigeration equipment (vessels, compressors, pumps, condensers, etc.) and a descriptive name or identification number. P&IDs should be set up to indicate relative elevations of equipment and to depict gravity and pumped flows where possible. Pre-fabricated equipment packages will typically not be shown in detail unless it is necessary for a clear portrayal of the refrigeration piping, instrumentation or utility connections.
    • Equipment description blocks which often list the manufacturer, model number, capacity, design limits, and materials of construction.
    • Valves, strainers, and relief valves shown schematically using the symbols on the lead sheet.
    • Instruments (pressure gauges and transmitters, level gauges and transmitters, temperature gauges and transmitters, etc.) identified and numbered in accordance with the lead sheet and ISA standards. Control strategy, including associated alarms and interlocks, should be clearly indicated with instrument functions and mounting locations shown.
    • Refrigeration piping contained in the system. Sections of piping typically contain a unique identification number which indicates the line size, service (contents of the line), line number (a unique number for referring to that line), pipe class (material of construction), insulation (if applicable), and heat tracing (if applicable).
    • Utility tie-ins to refrigeration equipment including normal instrument air supply connections to instruments
    • Refrigeration line continuations from drawing to drawing which extend to the edge of the drawing.
    • Title blocks for each drawing indicating the company name, facility location, type of drawing, simplified drawing name, drawing number, person who prepared the drawing, revision number, revision date, and provisions for drawing approval.
  • Material of Construction
  • Material of Construction



    The materials of construction of each equipment item must be clearly documented. Items which may be used to document the materials of construction for the refrigeration systems include:
    • Equipment description blocks contained on the piping and instrument diagrams.
    • Piping identification systems associated with the piping and instrument diagrams.
    • Equipment data forms filled out by facility personnel.
    • Fabrication or installation drawings provided by the manufacturer or vendor.
    • Material certificates provided by the manufacturer such as U-1, U-1A, U-2, and R-1 manufacturers data reports for pressure vessels.
    • Vendor manuals
  • Electrical Classifications
  • Electrical Classifications



    Areas of a facility which contain flammable or combustible materials are normally classified according to the flammability of these materials and the probability that they may be released from their normal containment system. This classification is conducted to determine the degree of protection required to prevent ignition of flammable materials by installed equipment or temporary equipment.
    References which may be used to define hazardous area classifications are:
    • NFPA 70, National Electrical Code, National Fire Protection Association (NFPA).
    • NFPA 497A, Classification of Class I Hazardous (Classified) Locations for Electrical Installations in Chemical Process Areas, National Fire Protection Association (NFPA).
    • ANSI-ASHRAE 15, Safety Code for Mechanical Refrigeration, American National Standards Institute-American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ANSI-ASHRAE).
    • Bulletin #111, Guidelines for: Ammonia Machinery Room Ventilation, International Institute of Ammonia Refrigeration (IIAR).
    Ammonia machinery rooms may be classified as non-hazardous, unclassified locations under the National Electrical Code (NEC) if they meet the criteria for ventilation systems set out in documents such as ANSI-ASHRAE 15 and IIAR Bulletin #111. Non-hazardous classification will eliminate the requirements imposed by a Class 1, Division 2 classification.
    ANSI/ASHRAE 15 2010 (8.12(h) which states: When ammonia is used, the machinery room is not required to meet Class I Division 2, of the National Electric Code providing (1) the mechanical ventilation system in the machinery room is run continuously and failure of the mechanical ventilation system actuates an alarm or (2) the machinery room is equipped with a detector that will automatically start the mechanical ventilation system and actuate an alarm at a detection level not to exceed 1,000 ppm.
  • Written SOP’s
  • Written SOP’s



    Ammonia refrigeration equipment operating procedures include:
    • Objectives and Purpose.
    • Safety and Health Considerations.
    • Equipment Information.
    • Function.
    • Identification and Capacity/Size
    • Operating Limits.
    • Safe upper and lower limits.
    • Consequences of deviation.
    • Steps required to correct or avoid deviation.
    • Steps for each operating phase:
      • Initial startup.
      • Normal operations.
      • Temporary operations.
      • Emergency shutdown.
      • Emergency operations.
      • Normal shutdown
      • Start up after an emergency shutdown
    We can also offer training for you on your newly developed operating procedures at your location or we can offer you training through a webinar if desired. Additional cost will be applied.
  • Hazard Assessment
  • Hazard Assessment



    This is the backup documentation (Hazard Assessment) for the RMP Submission. The Hazard Assessment must be reviewed and updated at least every 5 years.
    The offsite consequence analysis (Release Scenarios) consists of two elements:
    • Worst-case release scenario analysis to identify the potential reach and effect of hypothetical worst-case accidental releases.
    • Alternative release scenario analysis to identify the potential reach and effect of hypothetical accidental releases under more realistic circumstances.
  • Seismic Assessment
  • Seismic Assessment



    Site visit will be performed to review conditions and provide a brief review of structural plans (if available) provided to determine the proper response to the conditions. A written report will be provided documenting the conditions observed and any preliminary recommendations.
  • Manufacturer's Data Report for Pressure Vessels
  • Manufacturer's Data Report for Pressure Vessels



    Certification by a national board of boiler and pressure vessel Inspector that the pressure vessel has been constructed in accordance with ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.
  • RMP Hazard Assessment (off-site consequence analysis)
  • RMP Hazard Assessment (off-site consequence analysis)



    Hazard Assessment is the backup documentation for EPA’s RMP Submission
    Hazard Assessment Elements:
    • Identify the worst-case release for each regulated substance
    • Identify the alternative release scenario for each regulated substance
    • Define the areas of potential off-site impacts for worst-case release and alternative release scenarios
    • Identify affected population, public receptors, and environmental receptors within worst-case and alternative release scenario impact regions
  • Emergency Action Plan
  • Emergency Action Plan



    An emergency action plan (EAP) is a written document required by particular OSHA standards. [29 CFR 1910.38(a)] The purpose of an EAP is to facilitate and organize employer and employee actions during workplace emergencies. Well-developed emergency plans and proper employee training (such that employees understand their roles and responsibilities within the plan) will result in fewer and less severe employee injuries and less structural damage to the facility during emergencies. A poorly prepared plan, likely will lead to a disorganized evacuation or emergency response, resulting in confusion, injury, and property damage.
  • Vibration Analysis
  • Vibration Analysis



    The objective of a vibration analysis is to identifying noise or vibration in an operating compressor. Vibration analysis is done on motors and compressors to check for a failing element of a rotating machine such as bearing defects, motor misalignment, gear box and belt defects.

  • Oil Analysis
  • Oil Analysis



    An effective oil analysis program should focus on leading indicators that anticipate and help prevent compressor problems rather than trailing indicators that only serve to alert the user to an existing problem. These leading indicators will vary depending on lubricant type but several parameters are universally important. They include TAN (Total Acid Number), pH, viscosity, and contamination.

  • Refrigerant Analysis
  • Refrigerant Analysis



    Analysis to determine the amount of water present in the refrigeration system .

OSHA EPA